Learn more about Fort Nisqually Granary Building preservation project

Tacoma's Landmarks Preservation Commission is scheduled to be briefed next week on a plan to save a 163-year-old historic structure...

Tacoma’s Landmarks Preservation Commission is scheduled to be briefed next week on a plan to save a 163-year-old historic structure at the Fort Nisqually Living History Museum.

The Granary Building is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and Tacoma’s Register of Historic Places. Although it was restored in 1934 and 1984, an effort is under way to raise $140,000 needed to address structural problems that threaten the building, according to the Fort Nisqually Foundation’s Web site.

“In recent years, Metro Parks Tacoma has become concerned about the structural stability of the Granary at Fort Nisqually Living History Museum,” wrote Metro Parks Tacoma project manager Kristi Evans in a memo to the landmarks commission.

Evans noted a structural engineer at BCRA completed a building analysis and developed a plan that meets historic preservation standards while adding the support needed to stabilize the building. The plan involves upgrading and renovating the roof structure to help protect the building against future wind, snow, and seismic events by adding steel framing members and replacing the cedar shake roof. The structural modifications would not be visible from the outside of the building, and minimally visible from the inside.

Tacoma’s Landmarks Preservation Commission is scheduled to discuss the issue during its public meeting on Weds., June 26 at 5:30 p.m. at the Tacoma Municipal Building, 747 Market Street, Room 248. The agenda and meeting materials are available online here.

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