Tacoma open space habitat steward information session November 7, 2018

Tacoma’s urban forests and wetlands need your help! Recent studies show that Tacoma’s natural areas will lose significant forest area and native habitat within the next 20 years if we don’t act now! Urban forest decline is mostly due to invasive plants like blackberry and ivy. This impacts water quality, air quality, as well as the overall quality of our neighborhoods and open spaces. You can play a tremendous role in restoring Tacoma’s urban forests by becoming a Habitat Steward with EarthCorps and the City of Tacoma!

By becoming a Habitat Steward you will:

Learn to identify and remove aggressive weeds and plant native trees and shrubs;

Engage volunteers and lead ongoing volunteer events;

Strengthen the relationships in your neighborhood and community;

Improve the health of our urban forests and wetlands.

Come to this information session to learn about what EarthCorps and the City of Tacoma are doing to keep Tacoma’s urban forests and wetlands healthy, and how you can volunteer to become a habitat steward at one of the city’s open space sites.

Center for Urban Waters

326 E D St, Tacoma, WA 98421

Wednesday, November 7th: 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm

Register as a group or individual here – https://www.earthcorps.org/volunteer/event/a0E8000000PaSl6EAF/

Tacoma and Pierce County both have an abundance of local parks.  They belong to us and we should help take care of them.  Photo: Morf Morford

Tacoma and Pierce County both have an abundance of local parks. They belong to us and we should help take care of them. Photo: Morf Morford

Puget Sound

EarthCorps plays an important role in restoring Puget Sound, a national priority. In 2011, Friends of the Hylebos Watershed passed the torch to EarthCorps to drive stewardship along Hylebos Creek, a salmon-bearing stream that drains into the Sound. The next year, People For Puget Sound entrusted their near-shore restoration sites, blue carbon research, and Puget Sound Steward program to our care. Cities and conservation districts partner with EarthCorps to provide green infrastructure to reduce stormwater pollution into Puget Sound.

In 2014 in an historic agreement, EarthCorps was selected to provide long-term stewardship for 17 key sites along Commencement Bay. We promise to keep these former SuperFund sites safe for key wildlife like salmon and sea birds, for hundreds of years. We hope to see many more success stories like this soon in the Puget Sound and around the world.

– EarthCorps