Eddie Moore, founder of the White Privilege Conference, speaks at Martin Luther King Jr. celebration, January 16th

Eddie Moore, Jr, national educator on diversity, founder of the White Privilege Conference, and co-editor of books including Everyday White People Confront Racial and Social Justice: 15 Stories, will speak at the Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration at University of Puget Sound.

Everyone is welcome to the event on Tuesday, Jan. 16, 7–8:30 p.m., in Kilworth Memorial Chapel. Moore will give a talk titled “Dr. Martin Luther King: Why Keep Dreaming?” He will address King’s inspiring words, “We cannot turn back,” and discuss King’s view that we cannot rest while injustice and inequality permeate the country.

The evening will include short remarks from University of Puget Sound President Isiaah Crawford, Black Student Union President Nia Henderson ’20, and student body president Amanda Díaz ’18. The Keep Living the Dream Award, honoring campus members who embody King’s legacy, will be awarded.

Eddie Moore, Jr. Image courtesy University of Puget Sound

Eddie Moore, Jr.
Image courtesy University of Puget Sound

Eddie Moore knows well what it is like to be in the hot seat as America simmers in a political culture of seemingly irreconcilable factions. The White Privilege Conference that he created 18 years ago in order to create “a space for tough conversations” has drawn national attention. But it also has been attacked on social media and in the press by critics on several sides of the diversity issue. So when Moore asks for “courage” from those who want to support efforts to fight racism, he knows the magnitude of the request he is making.

The scholar and activist speaks openly about his fears for the future, stemming from the actions of those embracing white nationalism and defending hate speech as free speech. He told racial justice writer Debby Irving that he expects increasing disparities in the decade ahead.

“Plus, we have a new problem emerging as a result of technology,” he told her. “The very people we’ll need to work on these issues in the future—organizers, communicators, critical relationship builders—aren’t developing the skills, because they’re so hooked into their technology.

“There are also consequences we’ve never seen before. When someone can get sued or get a poor evaluation for the content they’re teaching, that’s a 21st-century challenge. When you can’t even teach this stuff without fear of serious, serious consequences? Wow.”

Eddie Moore is a highly regarded speaker and educator, and the founder and program director of the White Privilege Conference, which aims to move people beyond dialogue and into action on issues of diversity, power, privilege, and leadership.

He is co-founder of the journal Understanding and Dismantling Privilege, and co-editor of the books Everyday White People Confront Racial and Social Injustice: 15 Stories and The Guide for White Women Who Teach Black Boys. In 2014 he founded The Privilege Institute, which engages people through workshops, events, and publications. He gained his doctorate in education leadership from University of Iowa. Moore provides consulting, education, and research through America & MOORE.

The Martin Luther King Jr. Celebration is sponsored by the Center for Intercultural and Civic Engagement, Division of Student Affairs, Associated Students of the University of Puget Sound, and Office of Diversity and Inclusion.                         

                                  – University of Puget Sound