City could spend additional $250K for Chinese Reconciliation Park

The City of Tacoma is expected to decide this week whether to contribute an additional $250,000 to the Tacoma Chinese Garden and Reconciliation Park presently under construction along Schuster Parkway and overlooking Commencement Bay.

The cost overruns are related to the construction of a pavilion, or “ting,” that arrived unassembled in Tacoma from Fuzhou, China in September, and poor weather in November and December that slowed productivity.

“The estimate was based upon the City of Fuzhou’s construction schedule and projected labor forces which indicated construction would be completed in 30 days,” wrote Public Works Director Richard E. McKinley in a Jan. 19, 2011, letter to the City of Tacoma’s Board of Contracts and Awards. “Due to cultural differences, communication challenges, and various different code requirements, the estimated duration, effort and materials to construct the ting took substantially longer than originally anticipated. These elements included major items of work such as the stone masonry, construction of the ridge beams, and the tile roof. As a result of the longer construction duration, the cost of site security, equipment rentals, and scaffolding rental increased by as much as four times the original estimated amount. Inclement weather in November and December also affected the productivity of the construction crews and impacted the overall cost.”

If the purchase resolution is approved Tuesday by City Council, it would bring the total contract amount to $1,256,826.09 plus sales tax — nearly double the original contract with Clements Brothers, Inc., which totaled $656,862.09 and was approved by council on March 3, 2009.

On Nov. 2, 2010, City Council voted unanimously to amend the contract and direct an additional $350,000 from the city’s capital projects fund. At that time, City staff said the funds were needed to cover additional costs related to the construction of the ting.

“In the original contract, there was an allotted amount of money set aside for assisting with the construction of the ting,” wrote City Manager Eric Anderson in an Oct. 28 report to City Council. “The amount set aside was completed prior to the City being notified that the delegation from China had been vastly reduced and that no labor would be supplied by the City of Fuzhou. As the talks with Fuzhou have progressed, the City was informed that we needed to supply all of the labor along with some materials and all equipment for the construction of the pavilion. In addition, the previously submitted construction drawings were modified during the prefabrication of the pavilion in the City of Fuzhou.”

During the council meeting in November, Rae Bailey with the city’s public works department noted the funding increase involved two components: the relocation of contaminated dirt discovered on-site; and the construction of the ting.

“When the city of Fuzhou, our sister city, donated the ting to the city, they were going to supply all of the labor [and] all of the materials to construct the project,” said Bailey. “Unfortunately, earlier this year, we were informed they were only going to send over a delegation of two to three individuals, and that we were expected to construct the ting using our own forces. We tried really hard to seek volunteers to construct the ting. Unfortunately, due to liability issues, due to logistics, we were unable to have our contractor work with the volunteers. So we ended up contracting with Clements brothers, change-ordering this work into their project. So what you’re seeing is all the labor and equipment associated with the erection of the ting.”

The waterfront park aims to commemorate the events of Nov. 3, 1885, when a group that included a Tacoma city councilmember, judge, sheriff, and the mayor forced more than 200 Chinese from their homes and businesses. The park’s development has been guided by the non-profit Chinese Reconciliation Project Foundation. In 2005, more than 100 people gathered for a ceremony to mark the ground-breaking of the $12 million, four-acre park, which is located on land owned by the city and formerly occupied by the National Guard. Today, visitors to the partially-completed park will find a garden, 800-foot-long sea wall, winding foot paths, bridge, public art, interpretive displays, and recreation areas.

On Oct. 30, 2010, park organizers and members of city council and the general public marched 2.5 miles from downtown Tacoma to the waterfront park to commemorate the 125th anniversary of the event.

Tacoma City Council is scheduled to vote on the purchase resolution during its meeting on Tues., Feb. 8 at 5 p.m. in Council Chambers, located at 747 Market Street. For a copy of the agenda, click here — http://cms.cityoftacoma.org/cityclerk/Files/CityCouncil/Agendas/2011-FullAgendas/Full20110208.pdf .

For more information about the Tacoma Chinese Garden and Reconciliation Park, visit http://www.tacomachinesepark.org and http://www.crpftacoma.org .

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Tacoma City Council approves additional funding for Chinese Reconciliation Park

http://www.tacomadailyindex.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=88&cat=23&id=1868540&more=0

Nov 03 2010

By Todd Matthews

Tacoma City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to approve a purchase resolution that directs an additional $350,000 from the city’s capital projects fund toward the Chinese Garden and Reconciliation Park project currently under way along Schuster Parkway. The action increases the amount of the existing contract with Clements Brothers, Inc. to a cumulative total of $1,006,862.09. The original contract for $656,862.09 was approved by council on March 3, 2009.

According to City staff, the funds are needed to cover additional costs related to the construction of a pavilion, or ting, that arrived unassembled in Tacoma in September from China.

The issue arose last week when City Manager Eric Anderson noted the need for additional funds in his weekly report, dated Oct. 28, to city council.

“In the original contract, there was an allotted amount of money set aside for assisting with the construction of the ting,” wrote Anderson. “The amount set aside was completed prior to the City being notified that the delegation from China had been vastly reduced and that no labor would be supplied by the City of Fuzhou. As the talks with Fuzhou have progressed the City was informed that we needed to supply all of the labor along with some materials and all equipment for the construction of the pavilion. In addition, the previously submitted construction drawings were modified during the prefabrication of the pavilion in the City of Fuzhou.”

On Tuesday, Councilmember David Boe raised concerns over the additional costs and asked for clarification on why the money was needed. “This is a significant increase to this contract, almost 50 percent increase or thereabouts,” he commented before council voted on the purchase resolution.

According to Rae Bailey with the city’s public works department, the increase involves two components: the relocation of contaminated dirt discovered on-site; and the construction of the ting.

“When the city of Fuzhou, our sister city, donated the ting to the city, they were going to supply all of the labor [and] all of the materials to construct the project,” said Bailey. “Unfortunately, earlier this year, we were informed they were only going to send over a delegation of two to three individuals, and that we were expected to construct the ting using our own forces. We tried really hard to seek volunteers to construct the ting. Unfortunately, due to liability issues, due to logistics, we were unable to have our contractor work with the volunteers. So we ended up contracting with Clements brothers, change-ordering this work into their project. So what you’re seeing is all the labor and equipment associated with the erection of the ting.”

The waterfront park aims to commemorate the events of Nov. 3, 1885, when a group that included a Tacoma city councilmember, judge, sheriff, and the mayor forced more than 200 Chinese from their homes and businesses. The park’s development has been guided by the non-profit Chinese Reconciliation Project Foundation. In 2005, more than 100 people gathered for a ceremony to mark the groundbreaking of the $12 million, four-acre park, which is located on land owned by the city and formerly occupied by the National Guard. Today, visitors to the partially-completed park will find a garden, 800-foot-long sea wall, winding foot paths, bridge, public art, interpretive displays, and recreation areas.

For more information, visit http://www.tacomachinesepark.org/ and http://www.crpftacoma.org/ .

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City Council to vote on additional $350K for Chinese Reconciliation Park

http://www.tacomadailyindex.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=88&cat=23&id=1865973&more=0

Oct. 29, 2010

By Todd Matthews

Tacoma City Council is scheduled to vote Tuesday on a purchase resolution that would direct an additional $350,000 from the city’s capital projects fund toward the Chinese Garden and Reconciliation Park project currently under way along Schuster Parkway. The funds are needed to cover additional costs related to the construction of a pavilion, or ting, that arrived unassembled in Tacoma last month from China.

“In the original contract, there was an allotted amount of money set aside for assisting with the construction of the ting,” writes Tacoma City Manager Eric Anderson in his Oct. 28 report ( http://cms.cityoftacoma.org/cityclerk/Files/CityCouncil/CMOWeeklyReport/2010/WklyReport20101028.pdf ) to councilmembers. “The amount set aside was completed prior to the City being notified that the delegation from China had been vastly reduced and that no labor would be supplied by the City of Fuzhou. As the talks with Fuzhou have progressed the City was informed that we needed to supply all of the labor along with some materials and all equipment for the construction of the pavilion. In addition, the previously submitted construction drawings were modified during the prefabrication of the pavilion in the City of Fuzhou.”

If the purchase resolution (No. 38140) is approved by council on Tuesday, it would increase the amount of the existing contract with Clements Brothers, Inc. to a cumulative total of $1,006,862.09. The original contract for $656,862.09 was approved by council on March 3, 2009.

The waterfront park aims to commemorate the events of Nov. 3, 1885, when a group that included a Tacoma city councilmember, judge, sheriff, and the mayor forced more than 200 Chinese from their homes and businesses. The park’s development has been guided by the non-profit Chinese Reconciliation Project Foundation. In 2005, more than 100 people gathered for a ceremony to mark the groundbreaking of the $12 million, four-acre park, which is located on land owned by the city and formerly occupied by the National Guard. Today, visitors to the partially-completed park will find a garden, 800-foot-long sea wall, winding foot paths, bridge, public art, interpretive displays, and recreation areas.

Tacoma City Council will vote on the issue during its meeting Tues., Nov. 2, at 5:00 p.m. in Council Chambers located at 747 Market Street. For a copy of the agenda, click here — http://cms.cityoftacoma.org/cityclerk/Files/CityCouncil/Agendas/2010-FullAgendas/Full20101102.pdf .

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Walk for Reconciliation Saturday

http://www.tacomadailyindex.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=88&cat=23&id=1865697&more=0

Oct. 29, 2010

Tacoma Mayor Marilyn Strickland and a committee of 27 community leaders will join with members of the public on a symbolic Walk for Reconciliation Oct. 30 beginning at 10 a.m. in Tollefson Plaza in downtown Tacoma. The walk commemorates the 125th anniversary of the expulsion of Tacoma’s Chinese community on Nov. 3, 1885 and is meant to show how Tacoma is stepping forward into a new present and future. The roughly 2.5-mile walk will start at Tollefson Plaza near South 17th Street and Pacific Avenue and make the journey along the waterfront to the Chinese Garden and Reconciliation Park at 1714 N. Schuster Parkway. A celebration and performances will follow at the park beginning at noon. Learn more about the Walk for Reconciliation and the Chinese Reconciliation Project Foundation by visiting http://www.crpftacoma.org/ .

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Pavilion arrives in Tacoma for Chinese Reconciliation Park

http://www.tacomadailyindex.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=88&cat=23&id=1845924&more=0

http://i.feedtacoma.com/TDI-Reporters-Notebook/from-fuzhou-tacoma-pavilion-arrives/

Sept. 27, 2010

Organizers of a waterfront park that aims to commemorate the events of Nov. 3, 1885, when a group that included a Tacoma city councilmember, judge, sheriff, and the mayor forced more than 200 Chinese from their homes and businesses, are currently assembling a Chinese pavilion that was manufactured in Fuzhou and shipped to Tacoma.

According to Chinese Reconciliation Foundation Project (CRFP) board member Larry Hosley, a delegation from Fuzhou is in Tacoma to assemble the “ting,” or pavilion, over the next five weeks. The delegation is receiving volunteer assistance from members of the Pierce County Building and Construction Trades Council.

“It’s exciting for us because it will be the first structure to be put on the park,” said Hosley. “It’s been a long process.”

The park’s development has been guided by the non-profit CRFP, an organization spearheaded by Hosley’s wife, Theresa Pan Hosley. In 2005, more than 100 people gathered for a ceremony to mark the groundbreaking of the $12 million, four-acre park, which is located on land owned by the city and formerly occupied by the National Guard. Today, visitors to the partially-completed park will find a garden, 800-foot-long sea wall, winding foot paths, bridge, public art, interpretive displays, and recreation areas.

Hosley also noted the organization is planning an event on Oct. 30 entitled “Walk for Reconciliation” to mark the 125th anniversary of the Tacoma expulsion. Participants will march from Union Station in downtown Tacoma to the Chinese Reconciliation Park.

For more information, visit http://www.crpftacoma.org/ .

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City Council to discuss $7M shortfall for Chinese Reconciliation Project

http://www.tacomadailyindex.com/portals-code/list.cgi?paper=88&cat=23&id=1791888&more=0

June 21, 2010

By Todd Matthews

Tacoma City Council this week will learn more about funding challenges facing the Chinese Reconciliation Park presently under construction along Schuster Parkway and overlooking Commencement Bay.

At issue is $7 million needed for the last two phases of a project that broke ground in 2005 to commemorate the events of Nov. 3, 1885, when a racist group that included a city councilman, judge, sheriff, and the mayor forced more than 200 Chinese from their Tacoma homes and businesses. The vacant homes were then looted and burned to the ground.

The park’s development has been guided by the non-profit Chinese Reconciliation Foundation Project, an organization spearheaded by Tacoma resident Theresa Pan Hosley. In August 2005, more than 100 people gathered for a ceremony to mark the groundbreaking of the $12 million, four-acre park, which is located on land owned by the city and formerly occupied by the National Guard. Today, visitors to the partially-completed park will find a garden, 800-foot-long sea wall, winding foot paths, bridge, public art, interpretive displays, and recreation areas.

According to a memo written last week by Ryan Petty, Tacoma’s Community an Economic Development Department Director, to City Manager Eric Anderson, the $7 million shortfall needs to be closed in order to build the park’s Multicultural Pavilion, Reconciliation Hall, entrance gate, garden walls, and classrooms. “None of these future structures is funded,” notes Petty. “In addition to funding of the proposed structures, major issues and challenges associated with the project include maintenance and operation and programming. Staff has been and will continue to work with the Foundation and other pertinent entities to develop an appropriate approach to address these issue.”

City Council approved an ordinance Aug. 16, 2005, that allowed the City to accept two state grants worth approximately $1.03 million for the construction of the park. The ordinance also allowed the City to accept $20,000 in cash or in-kind equivalents from the Chinese Reconciliation Foundation and the City will match the grant funds with approximately $1.02 million from the Economic Development Special Revenue Fund.

City Council will discuss the Chinese Reconciliation Park during its study session Tues., June 22 at noon in the Tacoma Municipal Building North, 733 Market St., Room 16. Audio from the session will be broadcast live on TV Tacoma and on http://www.tvtacoma.com .

For more information, visit http://www.crpftacoma.org/ .

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Resolution would make Chinese Reconciliation Park name official

Sept. 24, 2007

On Sept. 25, City Council is scheduled to consider a resolution that would officially name City-owned property located at 1741 N. Schuster Parkway as the Chinese Reconciliation Park, which was recommended by the Landmarks Preservation Commission.

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Chinese Reconciliation Park developers near milestone

March 2, 2007

The City of Tacoma’s community and economic development department reported yesterday that the first phase of Chinese Reconciliation Park is expected to be completed in May. The news is the latest chapter in an ongoing effort to create a park and public space aimed to reconicle a dark chapter in Tacoma history.

According to historians, on Nov. 3, 1885, a racist group that included a city councilman, judge, sheriff, and the mayor forced more than 200 Chinese from their Tacoma homes and businesses. The vacant homes were then looted and burned to the ground.

The Chinese Reconciliation Foundation Project, an organization spearheaded by Tacoma resident Theresa Pan Hosley, was formed to raise money for the creation of a cultural center complete with winding paths, classrooms, exhibits, pavilion, bridge, grotto, and cobbled beach.

On Aug. 19, more than 100 elected officials, community leaders, and Tacoma residents gathered for a ceremony to mark the groundbreaking of the 4-acre, $6 million Chinese Reconciliation Park, located along Schuster Parkway overlooking Commencement Bay.

When the project is completed, it will include seawall construction and beach cleanup; grading to shape a dragon mound; pedestrian paths and a waterfront promenade; park benches, bike racks and trash receptacles; an intertidal grotto; landscaping and interpretive signs; tableau artwork; and Chinese artifacts.

City councilmembers approved an ordinance Aug. 16, 2005 that allows the City to accept two state grants worth a combined $1,032,320 for the construction of the park. The ordinance also allows the City to accept $20,000 in cash or in-kind equivalents from the Chinese Reconciliation Foundation and the City matched the grant funds with $1,019,679 from the Economic Development Special Revenue Fund, including $497,239 from a previous state legislative grant, for a combined total of $2,017,999 for the park project.

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A new chapter in Tacoma history

Aug. 22, 2005

By Todd Matthews, Editor

More than 100 elected officials, community leaders, and Tacoma residents gathered Aug. 19 for a ceremony to mark the groundbreaking of the 4-acre, $6 million Chinese Reconciliation Park, located along Schuster Parkway overlooking Commencement Bay.

“We are here to remember and ensure that Tacoma never again becomes home to such a terrible event,” said Mayor Bill Baarsma, referring to the events of Nov. 3, 1885, when a racist group that included a city councilman, judge, sheriff, and the mayor forced more than 200 Chinese from their Tacoma homes and businesses. The vacant homes were then looted and burned to the ground.

“They did not deserve to be forcibly expelled from the city,” added Baarsma. “It’s important for the mayor to be here today to redress that grievance. Today, we are turning a page and looking toward the future.”

Friday’s groundbreaking was the result of efforts by the Chinese Reconciliation Foundation Project, an organization spearheaded by Tacoma resident Theresa Pan Hosley and designed to raise money for the creation of a cultural center complete with winding paths, classrooms, exhibits, pavilion, bridge, grotto, and cobbled beach.

The first phase of the project, which is scheduled to begin in January and cost $1.8 million, will include construction of a protective seawall along the 800-foot length of the site, which is owned by the city on land formerly occupied by the National Guard.

City councilmembers approved an ordinance Aug. 16 that allows the City to accept two state grants worth a combined $1,032,320 for the construction of the park. The ordinance also allows the City to accept $20,000 in cash or in-kind equivalents from the Chinese Reconciliation Foundation and the City will match the grant funds with $1,019,679 from the Economic Development Special Revenue Fund, including $497,239 from a previous state legislative grant, for a combined total of $2,017,999 for the park project.

“There were fears this project would never go anywhere,” said Hosley, who joined the foundation in 1992, and recalled bringing her young daughter to board meetings. “After the long wait, we are finally here today to commemorate a new chapter in Tacoma history.”

Dr. David Murdoch recalled how he felt something was amiss in Tacoma shortly after he moved here in 1982. After learning about the Chinese expulsion, Dr. Murdoch said, “It clicked because if a family member has been hurt, ostracized or embarrassed, that has an effect on the family for years.” Dr. Murdoch joined with former City Councilman Robert Evans, former State Representative Art Wang (D-Tacoma) and community activists in 1992 to initiate the reconciliation process.

They formed a citizens committee which, assisted by the city’s Planning and Development Services Department, spent 14 months planning, making community contacts, and creating the preliminary design of a memorial facility.

“The event today will impact not only Tacoma, but the whole country,” said Dr. Murdoch. “People in mainland China know what we are doing today, and that is important.”

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City allocates funds for Chinese Reconciliation Park

Aug. 17, 2005

City Council members approved an ordinance Aug. 16 that allows the City to accept two state grants worth a combined $1,032,320 for the construction of Chinese Reconciliation Park on the shore of Commencement Bay. The ordinance also allows the City to accept $20,000 in cash or in-kind equivalents from the Chinese Reconciliation Foundation and the City will match the grant funds with $1,019,679 from the Economic Development Special Revenue Fund, including $497,239 from a previous state legislative grant, for a combined total of $2,017,999 for the park project.

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City welcomes Chinese Reconciliation Park

Aug. 16, 2005

The City of Tacoma will join with friends from the Far East this week to break ground on a $2 million phase of Chinese Reconciliation Park.

Citizens, local dignitaries and delegates from the Chinese government will gather from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Aug. 19 at the location on Ruston Way to usher in the city’s most visual step to reconcile the 1885 expulsion of Chinese inhabitants, when 600 Chinese residents were forcibly removed.

“The construction of Chinese Reconciliation Park illustrates the city’s commitment to the prosperity, not disparity, of all of our citizens,” said Mayor Bill Baarsma. “This was a tragic event in Tacoma’s history, and the leadership of our city wants to recognize the past suffering of many of this community’s pioneers and prevent such an atrocity from ever happening again. With the help of this symbolic park, our future leaders will never forget what happened here in 1885.”

The Reconciliation Park festivities will include:

– Ceremony opening by Connie McCloud, Puyallup tribal elder.

– Chinese Lion dance troupe.

– Chinese and Filipino dancers.

With this first phase, the park’s amenities will include:

– A new seawall, beach areas and a ramp to the water.

– Walking paths, a Chinese garden, garden rooms and interpretive displays.

The City Council accepted a grant of $544, 221 from the Washington Wildlife and Recreation Program and $478,099 from the States Aquatic Lands Enhancement Account for a combined $1,032,320. The grants were awarded by the Interagency Committee for Outdoor Recreation. The Chinese Reconciliation Foundation also donated $20,000 in cash or in-kind equivalents from for the first phase of construction. The city matched grant funds with $1,019,679 from the Open Space fund and another State grant for a combined total of $2,017,999. As additional funding is raised, consecutive phases of the park will be built.

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Groundbreaking scheduled Aug. 19 for Chinese Reconciliation Park

Aug. 15, 2005

The City of Tacoma, local dignitaries and delegates from the Chinese government will gather Aug. 19 from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. on the shore of Commencement Bay to break ground for Chinese Reconciliation Park. Ceremonies will include Mayor Bill Baarsma serving as moderator, an opening ceremony performed by Puyallup tribal leader Connie McCloud, consecration of the land by a Chinese priest and dancing by Chinese and Filipino performers. More information on the Chinese Reconciliation Project can be found at http://www.crpftacoma.org .

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City may allocate $1 million for Chinese Reconciliation Park

Aug. 11, 2005

City Council members heard the first reading of an ordinance Aug. 9 that would accept two state grants worth a combined $1,032,320 for the construction of Chinese Reconciliation Park on the shore of Commencement Bay. The ordinance would also allow the City to accept $20,000 in cash or in-kind equivalents from the Chinese Reconciliation Foundation and have the City match the grant funds with $1,019,679 from the Economic Development Special Revenue Fund for a combined total of $2,017,999 for the park project. A groundbreaking ceremony for Chinese Reconciliation Park is scheduled for Aug. 19.

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Ordinance would allow $2 million for Chinese Reconciliation Park

Aug. 8, 2005

City Council members are scheduled to hear the first reading of an ordinance Aug. 9 that would accept two state grants worth a combined $1,032,320 for the construction of Chinese Reconciliation Park on the shore of Commencement Bay. The ordinance would also allow the City to accept $20,000 in cash or in-kind equivalents from the Chinese Reconciliation Foundation and have the City match the grant funds with $1,019,679 from the Economic Development Special Revenue Fund for a combined total of $2,017,999 for the park project. A groundbreaking ceremony for Chinese Reconciliation Park is scheduled for Aug. 19.